Category Archives: Design

Deposit, Terms and $: The Presentation Podcast Episode #28

The Presentation Podcast

 

Episode #28, Deposit, Terms and $ for Presentation Design is live!

This week we’re all releasing our tax returns so listeners can fully understand any conflicts of interest we might have. Just kidding. We’re not doing that either. But we are talking all about how we do business and charge for presentation design: deposits, payment terms, discounts, penalties, rush rates, our favorite contract clauses and much more.

Don’t forget to give us a rating on iTunes if you like the Podcast and want to help spread the word!

Subscribe on iTunes and check out the show notes for more info.

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Categories: Design, PowerPoint.

When Do You Say No to a Project?: The Presentation Podcast Episode #27

The Presentation Podcast

 

Episode #27, When Do You Say No to a Project? is live.

Do we take on every presentation job that comes our way? Not exactly. This week we’ll discuss red flags, managing client requests, horror stories and other tales from the front.

Don’t forget to give us a rating on iTunes if you like the Podcast and want to help spread the word!

Subscribe on iTunes and check out the show notes for more info.

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Categories: Design, PowerPoint.

Stretching an Image Without Distortion

I have Photoshop open most of the day and yet, when I need to stretch a photo to fill the entire slide, I almost always use this hack directly in PowerPoint to make it happen without actually distorting the photo.

This also works great when converting a 4:3 presentation to 16:9.

Above is a quick video tutorial on how to do it!

Check out my YouTube Channel for this and more presentation hacks and tutorials.

 

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Categories: Design, Imagery, PowerPoint.

John Maeda’s Design in Tech Report 2017

Interesting insights into state of design from John Maeda.

Download PDF from Slideshare as slideshow rasterizes horribly.

And interesting poor data design practices. Come on, percentage axes not labeled as “%”, missing axes, those sized circle things, legends…There is a point where removing too much from a data visualization causes is to take longer to read.

 

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A Redesigned Oscar Winner Card

Redditor ShinyTile points out that poor graphic design may have contributed to Sunday night’s Oscar mixup.

I agree and took 5 minutes to redesign the card.

As ShinyTile points out, the Oscars logo catches the eye first, and in this context is entirely irrelevant to the purpose and usage of the card. I assume the cards are nice keepsakes (in addition to the statues), and so I’m okay with keeping the logo, but minimizing it and making it the last thing the eye might read. In its place at the top center, I would place the category in the same Oscar logo gold. That should be the first place the reader’s eye goes and it should serve to confirm the category winner about to be announced. But immediately after the category is processed by the reader, the next thing is the winner and the first thing announced—big, bold and in all caps.

I’m okay with the title being all caps, but I would make the additional information (in this case the producer names), sentence cap as I think this is easier for the eye to read, especially with longer and more complicated names. The only things read aloud are in black and the other two items are in the less prominent gold.

Just a suggestion…

 

Also, the LA Times points out that the mixup could also partially be due to poor envelope design.

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W. E. B. Du Bois’ Hand-Drawn Data Visualizations of African-American Life

 

Holy cow, look at these incredible hand-drawn data visualizations by W.E.B. Du Bois from 1900.

I admit that I knew and know very little about Du Bois and certainly had no idea that he created such visually unique and careful visualizations. The critic in me wants to say that some of these  do not hold to modern best data viz practices, but damn, sometimes you want to get lost in a careful study of data and spend some time with beautiful meaningful graphic design. And that’s what you certainly do with these visualizations.

Check out all of them at Public Domain Review and as so often is the case, major h/t to Kottke.

 

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The Greatest Sales Deck I’ve Ever Seen

 

This is an older post, but one which I just ran across. This is not only an excellent example of simplified, well-designed slides, but also a very direct and effective sales pitch for a company called Zuora.

Take a look at the article here and and all the slides below.

h/t The Presentation Guild

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Categories: Design, Pitching.
visual training presentation